An excerpt from the March 19, 2014 edition of the Wall Street Journal:

Lobster used to be the occasional tasty treat, taking up the pricey real estate on restaurant menus. But now thanks to a mashup of factors that are seeing prices drop, lobster is everywhere.

Lobster used to be the occasional tasty treat, taking up the pricey real estate on restaurant menus. But now thanks to a mashup of factors that are seeing prices drop, lobster is everywhere.

“Golden Corral bought 200,000 pounds of frozen lobster tails last August. It paid $3.79 per tail, or about $13 a pound—an approximately 20-year low for the restaurant, says Bob McDevitt, senior vice president of franchising for the 500-location Raleigh, N.C.-based chain. (By the time a restaurant buys lobster, its price has gone up as the supply chain can include wharf fees, a cut for dealers or wholesalers and processing-plant costs.)

Golden Corral is now thawing the tails for a limited-time special, a common practice with tails served at inexpensive restaurants. (The tails have a 12-month frozen shelf life, Mr. McDevitt says.) The special is timed to lure diners after a cold winter that kept them eating at home, he says. At $3.99 a tail, the company isn’t making a profit on the special, but it is likely to boost sales of buffet dinners, he says.”

A Lobster in Every Pot: From fast food to fine dining, the crustacean is showing up on more menus